Denise Bolds: It Takes a Village to Sodomize a Child

2 Dec

 

by Denise Bolds, MSW

December 1, 2011

Who hasn’t heard about Penn State University – where young boys were molested and raped anally for years while a community turned its head and eyes towards the money that flowed in through an entity that so many young boys dream of: to be a sports star.

Many have commented on how and why these boys remained silent and it took a single mom to make a report which toppled an empire we know as college sports. How did this happen? There is a saying: It takes a village to raise a child. It took a village (Penn State University) to sodomize and molest boys for years if not decades.

Take a look at the community surrounding Penn State University. Penn State is in a remote area with the university being the main source of income for many residents: from professional to housekeeping – Penn State puts food on the table for many families. Local businesses flourished as college students swiped their credit cards and spent millions of dollars under a guise of allegiance – endorsements flew in as the winning team hosted brands and logos in the marketing mania. The result being a multi-million dollar foundation offering programs to ‘at risk’ boys’ with a sexual predator at the helm. Penn State is a sociologist’s dream thesis, and I love sociology. The systematic dysfunction is widespread and it’s not clear if Penn State will ever recover.

As a community/town profits from the prosperity; the morality called awareness and accountability becomes smaller and smaller. Conflict theory emerges as those who have power exert power over the powerless. Everyone knows what happens to snitches…

So a community loses focus of accountability and morality: the local public school gives access to men to the children in these programs to molest in the school gym, college intern employees eyewitness an act of RAPE but don’t call the police – this same intern becomes assistant coach; is this a form of job security? The President of the university covers up any reporting, wives witness suspicious acts but remain quiet as they live in lovely homes, shop frequently and posses the title “Mrs. Child Rapist/Molester.”

If you remember your childhood, all the adults looked BIG and powerful in the eyes of a child. It wasn’t until I was an adult in my late 40’s that I realized just how small some of these adults actually were. With that size, intimidation also come with power, authority and materialism. Add sports in as a predominated patriarchal entity (Joe Pa) and you have the makings of societal dysfunction. Yes, the entire community of Penn State, both residential and professional, sodomized those ‘at risk’ boys for years. Is this what they call ‘taking one for the team?’

If I were a trustee on the board for Penn State University, I would be nervous – enrollment is likely to suffer. If I were a resident of the town where Penn State is located, I would be looking at property values of homes and profit margins of businesses for the next few years. Hell, if I were a resident – I would be relocating; with a sex scandal this large, my kid could be the next victim and my fellow neighbors, residents, church members may see something and not report a damn thing.

Does one dare to stand up to all of the above and speak out? To risk students rioting on YOUR lawn, breaking windows and overturning cars for a beloved coach? Hell no! YOU will remain silent and collect your paycheck even if you know that your neighbor’s ten year old son is being raped by the college football coach because you have that job at the university with benefits AND you also have season tickets to the game! Yay Team!

It takes a village to sodomize a child, Penn State University is the epitome of patrichal entitlement dysfunction.

This was submitted by Denise Bolds, MSW

Advertisements

One Response to “Denise Bolds: It Takes a Village to Sodomize a Child”

  1. J. S. Eaton December 5, 2011 at 8:16 pm #

    Ms. Bolds,

    How dare you publish this cursory and careless column. You should be ashamed of yourself, blatantly blaming the entire Penn State community for the unspeakable actions of Jerry Sandusky and disgraceful inactions of the administration. The media can say whatever they would like about Joe Paterno and the figures associated with this horrible scandal. That is to be expected and, in most cases, completely justified. Your disturbed perspective on the university as whole, however, is a flawed rant implicating all Penn State alumni and students in this terrible and tragic scandal. I am not prone to argument or confrontation, and even though the tone of your column is juvenile and clearly lacking in journalistic credibility, the claims that you convey are horrendous and therefore require refute.

    You condemn an entire community of educators, those who advised me and helped me achieve my goal of attending an ivy league veterinary school. Your writing reduces the countless academic contributions of an entire faculty of academics to “putting food on the table” or “profiting from prosperity”. You condemn an entire community of alumni as if they CHOSE to ignore Sandusky’s horrible misdoings when it is clear that only a small few knew about these atrocities. And, like much of the media, you turn a blind eye to all that is good at Penn State University. For instance, you selectively ignore the Dance Marathon and the countless hours that students, and students alone, spend raising millions of dollar for pediatric cancer every year. Every February, without fail, this event takes place at Penn State. Rarely does it receive media coverage beyond central Pennsylvania. And that’s how Penn State likes it. We do this and continue to do this because it is a part of our culture, just as much as football has been. For two years in a row as a undergraduate, I danced for 48 hours, to help this cause. And when I look back on my years at Penn State, it is the first mental photograph that comes to mind; not football and not Joe Paterno.

    Your shamefully immature characterization of our community is disgraceful and I, for one, am absolutely insulted and disgusted. And I do not hesitate to state that your education, unbelievably including a Master’s degree in Social Work, has failed you. It is absolutely acceptable to chastise Penn State’s flawed administration and its football program. Many have and will continue to do so. And in almost all instances, I feel that reprimand of such nature is absolutely justified. But I will stand and fight for my university and for myself and my character when cowards like you create “journalism” that implies that I and my fellow Penn Staters contributed to child abuse; that we created and took part in a culture that allowed this to happen; that we are to blame. You, Ms. Bolds, are guilty of partaking in a careless and cursory media culture that would target an entire university and accuses all Penn Staters of allowing child abuse to take place.

    I have read and re-read your column, trying to convince myself that I have “over-interpreted” your intentions. I am confident that I have not. Be careful, Ms. Bolds. I am not familiar with any other work that you may have done, but your sense of logic is clearly in question. This column conveys a very dangerous message – that anyone affiliated with or associated with Penn State University is an advocate of child molestation. And I, for one, refuse to stand by and let you condemn my character, to unjustifiably chide Penn State students and my fellow alumni, or to bring such a hateful accusation against the university that I love.

    J. S. Eaton, VMD

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: